9 things to do in and around the Grand Canyon

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Grand Canyon Sightseeing

The Grand Canyon National Park has been a national monument since 1908 and hosts more than 5 million visitors each year. This “hole in the ground” took nearly 6 million years to form and continues to move and shape itself under the direction of the Colorado River. It’s an ever-changing landscape that provides a home to five Indian tribes, 70 species of mammals, 250 species of birds, and 30 types of reptiles and amphibians.

Where you’re coming from Las Vegas to visit the Grand Canyon or interested in the Canyon’s numerous hiking trails, there are still many more attractions to see on your next vacation.

 

Grand Canyon Village Historic District              

Grand Canyon Village Historic District

Source: Flickr

A visit to the Grand Canyon Village Historic District takes you back to the early 1900s, when the town was just beginning to take shape. It remains more than 100 years later as the center for tourism of the Grand Canyon. Many of the structures here, including the Hopi House and the Kolb Studio, pay tribute to the Native American influences that dominate the region. Just east of the Grand Canyon Village, you’ll also find the visitor center, which houses The Canyon World, a lard 3-D map of the canyon’s experiences.

Fun fact: The Grand Canyon itself is bigger than Rhode Island.

 

Havasu Falls

Grand Canyon Attractions: Havasu Falls

Source: Flickr

Visiting Havasu Falls isn’t just a quick day hike. You will need to arrange a trip in advance and also obtain your reservations and permits, but it’s still a major destination for visitors who want to see the blue-green waterfalls. The Havasupai Tribe administers the land, which lies outside the boundary and jurisdiction of Grand Canyon National Park.

Fun fact: The Grand Canyon is not the deepest canyon in the world. That record belongs to Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon in Tibet.

 

The Grand Canyon Railway

Grand Canyon Railway

Source: Flickr

The Grand Canyon Railway touts itself as “almost as dramatic as the spectacular surroundings,” and that’s no hyperbole. When you take a ride on the Grand Canyon Railway, you’ll be joined by authentic western characters that really transport you to the early 1900s. Added bonus: It also helps keep 50,000 cars out of Grand Canyon National Park, which helps preserve the national treasure.

Fun fact: The park is home to a lot of wildlife from bighorn sheep to condors. But it’s the rock squirrels which record the most first-aid treatments for visitors. Don’t feed them.

 

The Hualapai Tribe

Grand Canyon: Hualapai Tribe

Source: Flickr

The Hualapai Tribe has lived in the Southwest for generations upon generations. The 2,300 members are mostly located in Peach Springs, where the tribe operates a hotel, restaurant, and gift shop. The tribe also operates a center of shopping, restaurants, and, of course, the Skywalk, on a piece of land along the western rim of the Grand Canyon.

 

Skywalk

Grand Canyon Skywalk

Source: Flickr

The Skywalk is a horseshoe shaped steel framed glass-floored structure that juts out 70 feet from the western rim of the Canyon, and hundreds of feet high. A walk out to the edge of the Skywalk is not for the faint of heart, but it will be a truly unforgettable view of the Grand Canyon.

Fun fact: The Grand Canyon itself is bigger than Rhode Island.

 

National Geographic Visitors Center & IMAX Theater

National Geographic Visitors Center & IMAX Theater

Source: Flickr

Leave it to National Geographic to create the ultimate Grand Canyon Visitors Center. The best adventures begin here after you book a Grand Canyon hotel room, with detailed information about the Inner Grand Canyon’s attractions, shopping, dining, and events. Fuel up before your adventure with a stop in the Explorer’s Café, which serves up quick dining and affordable prices. With favorites like pizza, sandwiches, hot dogs, and even Asian rice bowls with fresh veggies.. Afterwards, take in the award-winning IMAX film: “Grand Canyon – The Hidden Secrets” at one of the first IMAX theaters ever built.

Fun fact: The Grand Canyon is one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

 

More attractions near the Grand Canyon

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend

Source: Flickr

Many visitors seek out the popular Horseshoe Bend while on vacation to the Grand Canyon. It’s located about 140 miles from the South and North Rim but only 5 miles from the entrance to the Grand Canyon National Park. Once there, it’s roughly a 3/4 mile walk out to the edge overlooking beautiful bend in the Colorado River.

 

Lake Powell

Lake Powell, Arizona

Source: Flickr

Lake Powell is the second-largest man-made lake in America and one of the top vacation destinations too. You can rent houseboats, jet-skis and even fish along the 186 miles of water and canyons. There’s plenty to see when you book your trip to Lake Powell, including…

 

Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon

Source: Flickr

Antelope Canyon, one of the most photographed and stunning areas of the United States and located about 12 miles southeast of Lake Powell. Located on Navajo tribal land outside Page, Arizona, Antelope Canyon can only be visited through guided tours. For the best photos, lighting is better in the early hours and late morning.

With so much history to explore and cultures to absorb, the Grand Canyon is one of the most exciting national monuments you’ll ever visit. And, when you visit at least one of the attractions above, you’ll never hear that it’s “just a hole in the ground” ever again.

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